Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is currently responding to an outbreak of Queensland fruit fly (Qfly) in Perth's western suburbs.

  • Browsing ant, Lepisiota frauenfeldi, is an invasive?ant originating from Southern Europe. This pest?has?a proven ability to monopolise resources and form super-colonies.?

  • The European wasp is considered one of the worst wasps in the world -?harmful to people, our outdoor lifestyle?and to our horticultural and agricultural industries.

  • The following article provides information on spur-throated locust control for some horticultural crops in Western Australia.

  • This article provides information on spur-throated locust control in a non-agricultural setting.

  • Spur-throated locusts are mainly a tropical species which breed in the State’s north but can move large distances and can sporadically reach the Gascoyne and Mid-West regions.

  • This page provides information on chemical control for the spur-throated locust in Western Australia.

  • Yellow-winged locusts (Gastrimargus musicus) are native insects, distinguished by bright yellow wings, they are 35-50mm in length when mature and make a distinctive clicking noise when fly

  • During Biosecurity Blitz 2020 and again in April 2021 the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is providing Western Australians with an opportunity to help look for inv

  • Aphids reduce yields by direct feeding damage which causes flower and pod abortion and occassionally plant death in lupins.

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