Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • The opuntioid cacti?(except for Austrocylindropuntia vestita,?Cylindropuntia californica

  • African clubmoss (Selaginella kraussiana), also known as Selaginella, or spreading clubmoss, is an invasive fern ally that forms extensive dense carpets in damp sites.

  • One-off soil inversion results in the complete burial of the water repellent topsoil in a layer typically at a depth of 15–35cm, and brings to the surface a layer of wettable subsoil.

  • In poor growing seasons, crops may not be good enough to harvest.? Managers need to make some tough decisions, after assessing feed value for livestock, potential weed seed set, level of herbicide

  • In 2020 the Department is conducting over 300 Grains Research trials across the state from Kununurra in the north to Esperance in the south.

  • The Chemical weed control in canola bulletin has been produced by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, with co-investment from the Grains Research and Development Corporat

  • Summer weeds can rob subsequent crops of soil nitrogen and stored soil water. They can also reduce crop emergence by causing physical and/or chemical interfence at seeding time.

  • Hyssop loosestrife (Lythrum hyssopifolia) is a widely distributed weed in the south west of Western Australia.

  • Introducing new plants to an area can have positive and negative effects on the environment, economy and community.

  • Mimosa, giant sensitive tree, catclaw plant or bashful plant (Mimosa pigra) is a declared pest in Western Australia (WA).

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